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Long-term indoramin therapy in congestive heart failure: a double-blind, randomized, parallel placebo-controlled trial.

Abstract
Twenty-one patients with moderately severe congestive heart failure participated in a double-blind, randomized, parallel placebo-controlled trial designed to evaluate the effects of long-term (2 months) indoramin therapy on rest and exercise hemodynamics, exercise capacity and clinical status of patients with this clinical syndrome. The long-term administration of indoramin in patients (mean dose 50 mg every 12 hours) caused a mild reduction from baseline values in supine rest mean systemic blood pressure and, after dosing, elicited a significant reduction in systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and heart rate as well as a mild increase in stroke volume. Long-term indoramin therapy caused a small decrease, as compared with baseline exercise responses, in systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure at submaximal levels of exercise. It did not alter hemodynamic variables at maximal exercise, exercise capacity or overall clinical status, compared with findings at baseline or with placebo.
AuthorsC V Leier, P F Binkley, P H Randolph, D V Unverferth
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology (J Am Coll Cardiol) Vol. 9 Issue 2 Pg. 426-32 (Feb 1987) ISSN: 0735-1097 [Print] UNITED STATES
PMID3543093 (Publication Type: Clinical Trial, Journal Article, Randomized Controlled Trial, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't)
Chemical References
  • Indoles
  • Indoramin
Topics
  • Aged
  • Chemical Phenomena
  • Chemistry
  • Clinical Trials as Topic
  • Double-Blind Method
  • Female
  • Heart Failure (drug therapy)
  • Hemodynamics (drug effects)
  • Humans
  • Indoles (therapeutic use)
  • Indoramin (administration & dosage, therapeutic use)
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Oxygen Consumption (drug effects)
  • Physical Exertion
  • Random Allocation

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