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The action of recombinant bovine interferons on influenza virus replication correlates with the induction of two Mx-related proteins in bovine cells.

Abstract
Recombinant bovine interferon-alpha and -gamma differ in their action against influenza virus on bovine cells. Bovine IFN-alpha severely impairs early protein synthesis and replication of influenza virus in bovine cells in contrast to bovine IFN-gamma which fails to induce an antiviral state against influenza virus. Otherwise the IFN system seems to function normally in bovine cells since both bovine IFN-alpha and -gamma induce an antiviral state against vesicular stomatitis virus. The establishment of the specific antiviral state against influenza virus correlates with the induction by bovine IFN-alpha, but not -gamma, of two cytoplasmic proteins related to the IFN-induced mouse protein Mx involved in the mechanism of resistance of mice to influenza virus infection. This study suggests that bovines possess a system for resistance to influenza virus similar to the mouse Mx system.
AuthorsM A Horisberger
JournalVirology (Virology) Vol. 162 Issue 1 Pg. 181-6 (Jan 1988) ISSN: 0042-6822 [Print] UNITED STATES
PMID2827376 (Publication Type: Journal Article)
Chemical References
  • Interferon Type I
  • Mx1 protein, mouse
  • Myxovirus Resistance Proteins
  • Proteins
  • Recombinant Proteins
  • Viral Proteins
  • Interferon-gamma
  • GTP-Binding Proteins
Topics
  • Animals
  • Cattle
  • GTP-Binding Proteins
  • Influenza A virus (growth & development)
  • Interferon Type I (pharmacology)
  • Interferon-gamma (pharmacology)
  • Isoelectric Point
  • Molecular Weight
  • Myxovirus Resistance Proteins
  • Proteins (physiology)
  • Recombinant Proteins (pharmacology)
  • Vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus (growth & development)
  • Viral Interference
  • Viral Proteins (biosynthesis)
  • Virus Replication (drug effects)

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