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High-risk centers and the benefits for lower-risk transplants.

AbstractOBJECTIVES:
Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the transplantation of stem cells from a donor and an effective treatment for many hematologic malignancies. We sought to compare allogeneic HCT survival outcomes and hazard of death among US centers that treat higher-risk patients versus those in centers that do not perform lower-risk HCT procedures.
STUDY DESIGN:
We utilized 2008 to 2010 Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data. We categorized patients into 4 risk categories that align with factors shown in the literature to be associated with HCT survival. We stratified centers into those that do and do not conduct high-risk pre-transplant HCT.
METHODS:
To further evaluate the association between pre-transplant mortality risk and HCT survival by transplant center, we examined the association between risk category score and hazard of death using Cox proportional hazard modeling.
RESULTS:
There were 12,436 HCT recipients at 147 transplant centers. Of the 147 centers, 74 performed HCT for patients ranging from the lowest risk category to the highest category, and 73 centers performed only lower-risk HCT. Adjusting for all other factors, lower-risk patients that underwent transplants in lower- or higher-risk centers had a similar relative hazard of death (P ≤ .05).
CONCLUSIONS:
Low-risk patients had similar survival outcomes irrespective of whether they underwent transplant at higher- or lower-risk centers. Patient and payer policy implications could include initiatives that reduce travel for low-risk patients. Similarly, HCT center administrators and providers that manage higher-risk patients need not expect commensurate benefits in survival for lower-risk patients.
AuthorsSchelomo Marmor, James W Begun, Jean Abraham, Beth A Virnig
JournalThe American journal of managed care (Am J Manag Care) Vol. 21 Issue 9 Pg. e509-18 ( 2015) ISSN: 1936-2692 [Electronic] United States
PMID26618438 (Publication Type: Journal Article)

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