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The effect of the antipsychotic drug mosapramine on the expression of Fos protein in the rat brain: comparison with haloperidol, clozapine and risperidone.

Abstract
In this study, we examined the effect of the acute p.o. administration of the antipsychotic drug mosapramine, as well as the antipsychotic drugs clozapine, haloperidol and risperidone, on the expression of Fos protein in the medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens and dorsolateral striatum of rat brain. The administration of mosapramine (1 or 3 mg/kg) significantly increased the number of Fos protein positive neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex, but not in the dorsolateral striatum. In addition, mosapramine (1, 3 or 10 mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent increase in the number of Fos protein positive neurons in the nucleus accumbens. The acute administration of 10 mg/kg of mosapramine significantly increased the number of Fos protein positive neurons in all brain regions. The acute administration of clozapine (30 mg/kg), similarly to mosapramine at lower doses (1 or 3 mg/kg), significantly increased the number of Fos protein positive neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens, but not dorsolateral striatum. In contrast, haloperidol (0.3 mg/kg) significantly increased the number of Fos protein positive neurons in the nucleus accumbens and dorsolateral striatum, but not medial prefrontal cortex. The acute administration of risperidone (0.3 or 1 mg/kg) did not affect the number of Fos protein positive neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens or dorsolateral striatum of rat brain, whereas a 3 mg/kg dose of risperidone significantly increased the number of Fos protein positive neurons in all brain regions. These results suggest that the ability of mosapramine to enhance expression of Fos protein in the medial prefrontal cortex may contribute to a clozapine-like profile with respect to actions on negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Furthermore, the lack of effect of low doses of mosapramine on Fos protein expression in the dorsolateral striatum, an area believed to play a role in movement, suggests that it may have a lower tendency to induce neurological side effects.
AuthorsM Fujimura, K Hashimoto, K Yamagami
JournalLife sciences (Life Sci) Vol. 67 Issue 23 Pg. 2865-72 (Oct 27 2000) ISSN: 0024-3205 [Print] ENGLAND
PMID11106001 (Publication Type: Comparative Study, Journal Article)
Chemical References
  • Antipsychotic Agents
  • Benzazepines
  • Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos
  • mosapramine
  • Clozapine
  • Haloperidol
  • Risperidone
Topics
  • Animals
  • Antipsychotic Agents (pharmacology)
  • Benzazepines (pharmacology)
  • Brain (drug effects, metabolism)
  • Clozapine (pharmacology)
  • Corpus Striatum (drug effects, metabolism)
  • Gene Expression Regulation (drug effects)
  • Genes, fos (drug effects)
  • Haloperidol (pharmacology)
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • Male
  • Neurons (drug effects, metabolism)
  • Nucleus Accumbens (drug effects, metabolism)
  • Prefrontal Cortex (drug effects, metabolism)
  • Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos (analysis, biosynthesis)
  • Rats
  • Rats, Wistar
  • Risperidone (pharmacology)

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