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The effects of serum iminodipeptides and prednisolone on superoxide generation and tyrosyl phosphorylation of proteins in neutrophils from a patient with prolidase deficiency.

Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the effects of serum iminodipeptides and prednisolone on superoxide generation and tyrosyl phosphorylation of proteins in neutrophils from a patient with prolidase deficiency, and also to find the causative effects of superoxide on inflammatory skin lesions. When the neutrophils from a patient with prolidase deficiency (PDPPMN) were preincubated with prolyl-proline (Pro-Pro), which is one of the iminodipeptides found at high concentration in the serum of patients with prolidase deficiency, the N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced superoxide generation was enhanced in a concentration-dependent manner, although the extent of enhancing effect was lower than that in neutrophils from healthy humans (HPPMN). Pro-Pro also enhanced superoxide generation induced by opsonized zymosan (OZ) in PDPPMN but not that induced by arachidonic acid or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Herbimycin A and genistein decreased the fMLP- and OZ-induced superoxide generations after priming by Pro-Pro. 1-(5-isoquinoline-sulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine (H-7) and staurosporine did not decrease, but rather enhanced, the superoxide generation in a low concentration range. When PDPPMN were prepared, tyrosyl phosphorylation of 45 kDa protein in PDPPMN had already occurred. The phosphorylation was scarcely increased by incubation of the cells with Pro-Pro, in contrast to that in HPPMN. Genistein decreased the phosphorylation of 45 kDa protein in both PDPPMN and HPPMN. These results suggest that the priming effect of iminodipeptides on superoxide generation in PDPPMN is coupled with phosphorylation of 45 kDa protein by protein tyrosine kinase. Protein tyrosine kinase may play a critical role(s) in the regulatory mechanism of priming by iminodipeptides and activation of NADPH oxidase in the patient's neutrophils. In prolidase deficiency, the characteristic skin manifestations are inflammatory indurations and chronic leg ulcers. Prednisolone improves the ulcers, and this compound decreased the fMLP- and OZ-induced superoxide generation and tyrosyl phosphorylation of 45 kDa protein in the patient's neutrophils after priming by Pro-Pro. When inflammatory skin lesions were present, the levels of iminodipeptides in the patient's serum were elevated and the superoxide generation by neutrophils was up-regulated. When skin lesions were healing or absent, the levels of iminodipeptides in the patient's serum and superoxide generation by neutrophils were higher than those of healthy controls but lower than those in the inflammatory stages. Thus, the enhancement of superoxide generation by neutrophils via serum iminodipeptides would be one of the inducers of inflammatory skin lesions. Corticosteroid administration might be a therapeutic modality of choice for skin lesions.
AuthorsJ Zhang, K Sugahara, K Yasuda, H Kodama, Y Sagara, H Kodama
JournalFree radical biology & medicine (Free Radic Biol Med) Vol. 24 Issue 5 Pg. 689-98 (Mar 15 1998) ISSN: 0891-5849 [Print] UNITED STATES
PMID9586797 (Publication Type: Journal Article)
Chemical References
  • Blood Proteins
  • Dipeptides
  • Enzyme Inhibitors
  • Imines
  • Superoxides
  • 1-(5-Isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-Methylpiperazine
  • Proline
  • Prednisolone
  • Genistein
  • Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
  • Dipeptidases
  • proline dipeptidase
  • Staurosporine
Topics
  • 1-(5-Isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-Methylpiperazine (pharmacology)
  • Blood Proteins (metabolism)
  • Dipeptidases (deficiency)
  • Dipeptides (blood)
  • Enzyme Inhibitors (pharmacology)
  • Genistein (pharmacology)
  • Humans
  • Imines (blood)
  • Neutrophils (drug effects, metabolism)
  • Phosphorylation
  • Prednisolone (therapeutic use)
  • Proline (chemistry)
  • Protein-Tyrosine Kinases (blood)
  • Staurosporine (pharmacology)
  • Superoxides (metabolism)

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