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Outcomes of pregnancy after bariatric surgery.

AbstractBACKGROUND:
Maternal obesity is associated with increased risks of gestational diabetes, large-for-gestational-age infants, preterm birth, congenital malformations, and stillbirth. The risks of these outcomes among women who have undergone bariatric surgery are unclear.
METHODS:
We identified 627,693 singleton pregnancies in the Swedish Medical Birth Register from 2006 through 2011, of which 670 occurred in women who had previously undergone bariatric surgery and for whom presurgery weight was documented. For each pregnancy after bariatric surgery, up to five control pregnancies were matched for the mother's presurgery body-mass index (BMI; we used early-pregnancy BMI in the controls), age, parity, smoking history, educational level, and delivery year. We assessed the risks of gestational diabetes, large-for-gestational-age and small-for-gestational-age infants, preterm birth, stillbirth, neonatal death, and major congenital malformations.
RESULTS:
Pregnancies after bariatric surgery, as compared with matched control pregnancies, were associated with lower risks of gestational diabetes (1.9% vs. 6.8%; odds ratio, 0.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.13 to 0.47; P<0.001) and large-for-gestational-age infants (8.6% vs. 22.4%; odds ratio, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.44; P<0.001). In contrast, they were associated with a higher risk of small-for-gestational-age infants (15.6% vs. 7.6%; odds ratio, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.64 to 2.95; P<0.001) and shorter gestation (273.0 vs. 277.5 days; mean difference -4.5 days; 95% CI, -2.9 to -6.0; P<0.001), although the risk of preterm birth was not significantly different (10.0% vs. 7.5%; odds ratio, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.78; P=0.15). The risk of stillbirth or neonatal death was 1.7% versus 0.7% (odds ratio, 2.39; 95% CI, 0.98 to 5.85; P=0.06). There was no significant between-group difference in the frequency of congenital malformations.
CONCLUSIONS:
Bariatric surgery was associated with reduced risks of gestational diabetes and excessive fetal growth, shorter gestation, an increased risk of small-for-gestational-age infants, and possibly increased mortality. (Funded by the Swedish Research Council and others.).
AuthorsKari Johansson, Sven Cnattingius, Ingmar Näslund, Nathalie Roos, Ylva Trolle Lagerros, Fredrik Granath, Olof Stephansson, Martin Neovius
JournalThe New England journal of medicine (N Engl J Med) Vol. 372 Issue 9 Pg. 814-24 (Feb 26 2015) ISSN: 1533-4406 [Electronic] United States
PMID25714159 (Publication Type: Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't)
Topics
  • Adult
  • Bariatric Surgery
  • Birth Weight
  • Body Mass Index
  • Case-Control Studies
  • Diabetes, Gestational (epidemiology)
  • Female
  • Fetal Macrosomia (epidemiology)
  • Gestational Age
  • Humans
  • Infant, Small for Gestational Age
  • Odds Ratio
  • Pregnancy
  • Pregnancy Outcome
  • Risk

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