HOMEPRODUCTSSERVICESCOMPANYCONTACTFAQResearchDictionaryPharmaMobileSign Up FREE or Login

Hepatitis C virus co-infection increases the risk of anti-tuberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

AbstractBACKGROUND:
The country of Georgia has a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection.
PURPOSE:
To determine whether HCV co-infection increases the risk of incident drug-induced hepatitis among patients on first-line anti-TB drug therapy.
METHODS:
Prospective cohort study; HCV serology was obtained on all study subjects at the time of TB diagnosis; hepatic enzyme tests (serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT] activity) were obtained at baseline and monthly during treatment.
RESULTS:
Among 326 study patients with culture-confirmed TB, 68 (21%) were HCV co-infected, 14 (4.3%) had chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (hepatitis B virus surface antigen positive [HBsAg+]), and 6 (1.8%) were HIV co-infected. Overall, 19% of TB patients developed mild to moderate incident hepatotoxicity. In multi-variable analysis, HCV co-infection (adjusted Hazards Ratio [aHR]=3.2, 95% CI=1.6-6.5) was found to be an independent risk factor for incident anti-TB drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Survival analysis showed that HCV co-infected patients developed hepatitis more quickly compared to HCV seronegative patients with TB.
CONCLUSION:
A high prevalence of HCV co-infection was found among patients with TB in Georgia. Drug-induced hepatotoxicity was significantly associated with HCV co-infection but severe drug-induced hepatotoxicity (WHO grade III or IV) was rare.
AuthorsNino Lomtadze, Lali Kupreishvili, Archil Salakaia, Sergo Vashakidze, Lali Sharvadze, Russell R Kempker, Matthew J Magee, Carlos del Rio, Henry M Blumberg
JournalPloS one (PLoS One) Vol. 8 Issue 12 Pg. e83892 ( 2013) ISSN: 1932-6203 [Electronic] United States
PMID24367617 (Publication Type: Journal Article, Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.)
Chemical References
  • Antitubercular Agents
Topics
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Antitubercular Agents (adverse effects, therapeutic use)
  • Coinfection
  • Female
  • Georgia (epidemiology)
  • HIV Infections (complications, epidemiology)
  • Hepatitis B (complications, epidemiology)
  • Hepatitis C (complications, epidemiology, genetics)
  • Humans
  • Liver (drug effects)
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Prevalence
  • Risk Factors
  • Tuberculosis, Pulmonary (complications, drug therapy, epidemiology)
  • Young Adult

Join CureHunter, for free Research Interface BASIC access!

Take advantage of free CureHunter research engine access to explore the best drug and treatment options for any disease. Find out why thousands of doctors, pharma researchers and patient activists around the world use CureHunter every day.
Realize the full power of the drug-disease research network!


Choose Username:
Email:
Password:
Verify Password: