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Identification of a self-association domain in the Ewing's sarcoma protein: a novel function for arginine-glycine-glycine rich motifs?

Abstract
The Ewing's sarcoma (EWS) protein is a ubiquitously expressed RNA chaperone. The EWS protein localizes predominantly to the nucleus. Previous reports have suggested that the EWS protein is capable of dimerizing. However, to date this has not been confirmed. Here, using a novel panel of recombinant proteins, we have performed an in vitro biomolecular interaction analysis of the EWS protein. We have demonstrated that all three arginine-glycine-glycine (RGG) motifs are capable of binding directly to the survival motor neuron protein, a Tudor domain containing EWS binding partner. We have also confirmed EWS is capable of self-associating, and we have mapped this binding domain to the RGG motifs. We have also found that self-association may be required for EWS nuclear import. This is the first direct evidence of RGG domains being involved in self-association and has implications on all RGG-containing proteins.
AuthorsDebra J Shaw, Robert Morse, Adrian G Todd, Paul Eggleton, Christian L Lorson, Philip J Young
JournalJournal of biochemistry (J Biochem) Vol. 147 Issue 6 Pg. 885-93 (Jun 2010) ISSN: 1756-2651 [Electronic] England
PMID20211855 (Publication Type: Journal Article, Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't)
Chemical References
  • Nerve Tissue Proteins
  • RNA-Binding Protein EWS
  • Recombinant Proteins
  • Survival of Motor Neuron 1 Protein
  • Arginine
  • Glycine
Topics
  • Arginine (metabolism)
  • Binding Sites
  • Chromatography, Gel
  • Glycine (metabolism)
  • HeLa Cells
  • Humans
  • Nerve Tissue Proteins (chemistry, metabolism)
  • Neurons (metabolism)
  • Protein Binding
  • Protein Multimerization
  • RNA-Binding Protein EWS (chemistry, genetics, isolation & purification, metabolism)
  • Recombinant Proteins
  • Surface Plasmon Resonance
  • Survival of Motor Neuron 1 Protein

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