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Indinavir-associated facial lipodystrophy in HIV-infected patients.

Abstract
The objectives of this study were to document the prevalence of facial lipodystrophy in patients with HIV infection receiving protease inhibitors and to identify associated factors. All patients with HIV infection receiving protease inhibitors seen at an HIV clinic in Hong Kong during a 2-month period, from August to October 1997, were assessed for facial lipodystrophy. Among 29 patients who had been receiving indinavir for 3 months or more, facial lipodystrophy was found in 7 (24%). Facial lipodystrophy in these patients was found to be an isolated event and was not associated with noticeable wasting elsewhere. The development of facial lipodystrophy was not found to be associated with age, sex, ethnicity, route of HIV transmission, CD4 cell count, history of AIDS-defining illness, or concurrent anti-retroviral treatment. Facial lipodystrophy was not observed in patients who had received indinavir for less than 3 months. The condition was also not found in patients taking other protease inhibitors, although this could be due to the small sample size. Prospective study of this condition with a larger sample and with objective anthropomorphic measurements would be desirable. In conclusion, facial lipodystrophy is a common occurrence among patients receiving indinavir, and physicians should be alerted to this condition.
AuthorsT T Ho, K C Chan, K H Wong, S S Lee
JournalAIDS patient care and STDs (AIDS Patient Care STDS) Vol. 13 Issue 1 Pg. 11-6 (Jan 1999) ISSN: 1087-2914 [Print] UNITED STATES
PMID11362080 (Publication Type: Journal Article)
Chemical References
  • HIV Protease Inhibitors
  • Indinavir
Topics
  • Adult
  • Face
  • Female
  • HIV Infections (drug therapy)
  • HIV Protease Inhibitors (adverse effects)
  • Hong Kong (epidemiology)
  • Humans
  • Indinavir (adverse effects)
  • Lipodystrophy (chemically induced, epidemiology)
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Prevalence
  • Retrospective Studies

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