HOMEPRODUCTSSERVICESCOMPANYCONTACTFAQResearchDictionaryPharmaMobileSign Up FREE or Login

Splenosis

The spontaneous transplantation of splenic tissue to unusual sites after open splenic trauma, e.g., after automobile accidents, gunshot or stab wounds. The splenic pulp implants appear as red-blue nodules on the peritoneum, omentum, and mesentery, morphologically similar to multifocal pelvic endometriosis. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Also Known As:
Splenoses
Networked: 181 relevant articles (5 outcomes, 8 trials/studies)

Relationship Network

Disease Context: Research Results

Related Diseases

1. Wounds and Injuries (Trauma)
2. Infection
3. Rupture
4. Hemorrhage
5. Hemangioma (Angioma)

Experts

1. Rizzo, Stefania: 2 articles (01/2009 - 01/2009)
2. Rocco, Bernardo: 2 articles (01/2009 - 01/2009)
3. Belmonte, Maddalena: 2 articles (01/2009 - 01/2009)
4. Monfardini, Lorenzo: 2 articles (01/2009 - 01/2009)
5. Bodrov, Iu D: 2 articles (11/2003 - 11/2002)
6. Buń≠lov, V M: 2 articles (11/2003 - 11/2002)
7. Borisanov, A V: 2 articles (11/2003 - 11/2002)
8. Baldari, Sergio: 1 article (06/2015)
9. Belletti, Alice: 1 article (06/2015)
10. Leitz, Evan M: 1 article (06/2015)

Drugs and Biologics

Drugs and Important Biological Agents (IBA) related to Splenosis:
1. Technetium (Technetium 99m)IBA
2. CreatinineIBA
3. Somatostatin Receptors (Somatostatin Receptor)IBA
4. Colloids (Colloid)IBA
5. tebufenozide (Mimic)IBA
6. Technetium Tc 99m Sulfur ColloidFDA Link
7. SulfurIBA
8. IronIBA
9. Immunoglobulin M (IgM)IBA
10. ferric oxide (iron oxide)IBA

Therapies and Procedures

1. Splenectomy
2. Transplantation (Transplant Recipients)
3. Kidney Transplantation
4. Laparotomy
5. Segmental Mastectomy (Lumpectomy)