HOMEPRODUCTSSERVICESCOMPANYCONTACTFAQResearchDictionaryPharmaMobileSign Up FREE or Login

Shoulder Dislocation (Dislocation, Shoulder)

Displacement of the HUMERUS from the SCAPULA.
Also Known As:
Dislocation, Shoulder; Glenohumeral Subluxation; Dislocation, Glenohumeral; Dislocations, Glenohumeral; Dislocations, Shoulder; Glenohumeral Dislocations; Glenohumeral Subluxations; Shoulder Dislocations; Subluxation, Glenohumeral; Subluxations, Glenohumeral; Glenohumeral Dislocation
Networked: 205 relevant articles (14 outcomes, 18 trials/studies)

Relationship Network

Disease Context: Research Results

Related Diseases

1. Pain (Aches)
2. Arthritis (Polyarthritis)
3. Shoulder Pain
4. Abdominal Pain (Pain, Abdominal)
5. Unconsciousness (Loss of Consciousness)

Experts

1. Edwards, T Bradley: 3 articles (11/2009 - 08/2003)
2. Cooke, Chris: 2 articles (05/2015 - 01/2015)
3. Vaidya, Rahul: 2 articles (05/2015 - 01/2015)
4. Cooke, Pat: 2 articles (05/2015 - 01/2015)
5. Lacy, Kyle: 2 articles (05/2015 - 01/2015)
6. Costantini, A: 2 articles (02/2015 - 01/2000)
7. Hames, Heather: 2 articles (11/2011 - 01/2009)
8. Blaivas, Michael: 2 articles (09/2011 - 05/2006)
9. Raiss, P: 2 articles (04/2009 - 11/2007)
10. Rickert, M: 2 articles (04/2009 - 11/2007)

Drugs and Biologics

Drugs and Important Biological Agents (IBA) related to Shoulder Dislocation:
1. Lidocaine (Xylocaine)FDA LinkGeneric
2. BenzodiazepinesIBA
08/01/2008 - "The aim was to determine if intraarticular lidocaine (IAL) injection is as effective as IV procedural sedation with narcotics and benzodiazepines for reduction of anterior shoulder dislocations. "
02/01/2015 - "The list of level A recommendations includes: 1) use of IV acetaminophen for opioid sparing properties and reduction of opioid related adverse events; 2) ketamine-midazolam combination preferred over fentanyl-midazolam fentanyl-propofol in pediatric patients; 3) boluses of ketamine IV (particularly in the population under the age of 2 years and over the age of 13) can lead to impairment of the upper airways, including the onset of laryngospasm, requiring specific expertise and skills for administration; 4) the use of ketamine increases the potential risk of psychomotor agitation, which can happen in up to 30% of adult patients (this peculiar side effect can be significantly reduced by concomitant systemic use of benzodiazepines); 5) for shoulder dislocations and fractures of the upper limbs, the performance of brachial plexus block reduces the time spent in ED compared to sedation; 6) pain relief and the use of opioids in patients with acute abdominal pain do not increase the risk of error in the diagnostic and therapeutic pathway in adults; 7) in newborns, the administration of sucrose reduces behavioural responses to blood sampling from a heel puncture; 8) in newborns, breastfeeding or formula feeding during the procedure reduces the measures of distress; 9) in pediatric patients, non-pharmacological techniques such as distraction, hypnosis and cognitive-behavioural interventions reduce procedural pain caused by the use of needles; 10) in pediatric patients, preventive application of eutectic mixtures of prilocaine and lidocaine allows arterial and venous samples to be taken in optimum conditions; 11) in pediatric patients, the combination of hypnotics (midazolam) and N2O is effective for procedural pain, but may be accompanied by loss of consciousness. "
3. Propofol (Diprivan)FDA LinkGeneric
4. Midazolam (Versed)FDA LinkGeneric
5. Hypnotics and Sedatives (Sedatives)IBA
03/01/2003 - "We enquired whether patients with acute first time shoulder dislocation are managed according to protocols in accident and emergency departments; which radiographs are deemed necessary before and after reduction; which reduction methods are generally performed; and what kind of pain relief or sedatives are generally administered. "
05/01/2005 - "We report the successful use of SMT in the prone position for the reduction of traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations, mainly without requirement of any sedatives or opiate analgesics. "
03/01/2009 - "ERM for the reduction of acute anterior dislocation of the shoulder is a safe and reliable method, mainly without requirement for any sedatives or opiate analgesics, that can be performed relatively painlessly for anterior shoulder dislocations. "
02/01/2015 - "The list of level A recommendations includes: 1) use of IV acetaminophen for opioid sparing properties and reduction of opioid related adverse events; 2) ketamine-midazolam combination preferred over fentanyl-midazolam fentanyl-propofol in pediatric patients; 3) boluses of ketamine IV (particularly in the population under the age of 2 years and over the age of 13) can lead to impairment of the upper airways, including the onset of laryngospasm, requiring specific expertise and skills for administration; 4) the use of ketamine increases the potential risk of psychomotor agitation, which can happen in up to 30% of adult patients (this peculiar side effect can be significantly reduced by concomitant systemic use of benzodiazepines); 5) for shoulder dislocations and fractures of the upper limbs, the performance of brachial plexus block reduces the time spent in ED compared to sedation; 6) pain relief and the use of opioids in patients with acute abdominal pain do not increase the risk of error in the diagnostic and therapeutic pathway in adults; 7) in newborns, the administration of sucrose reduces behavioural responses to blood sampling from a heel puncture; 8) in newborns, breastfeeding or formula feeding during the procedure reduces the measures of distress; 9) in pediatric patients, non-pharmacological techniques such as distraction, hypnosis and cognitive-behavioural interventions reduce procedural pain caused by the use of needles; 10) in pediatric patients, preventive application of eutectic mixtures of prilocaine and lidocaine allows arterial and venous samples to be taken in optimum conditions; 11) in pediatric patients, the combination of hypnotics (midazolam) and N2O is effective for procedural pain, but may be accompanied by loss of consciousness. "
6. Narcotics (Narcotic Analgesics)IBA
7. KetamineFDA LinkGeneric
02/01/2013 - "A second patient underwent ketamine sedation for reduction of a shoulder dislocation. "
02/01/2015 - "The list of level A recommendations includes: 1) use of IV acetaminophen for opioid sparing properties and reduction of opioid related adverse events; 2) ketamine-midazolam combination preferred over fentanyl-midazolam fentanyl-propofol in pediatric patients; 3) boluses of ketamine IV (particularly in the population under the age of 2 years and over the age of 13) can lead to impairment of the upper airways, including the onset of laryngospasm, requiring specific expertise and skills for administration; 4) the use of ketamine increases the potential risk of psychomotor agitation, which can happen in up to 30% of adult patients (this peculiar side effect can be significantly reduced by concomitant systemic use of benzodiazepines); 5) for shoulder dislocations and fractures of the upper limbs, the performance of brachial plexus block reduces the time spent in ED compared to sedation; 6) pain relief and the use of opioids in patients with acute abdominal pain do not increase the risk of error in the diagnostic and therapeutic pathway in adults; 7) in newborns, the administration of sucrose reduces behavioural responses to blood sampling from a heel puncture; 8) in newborns, breastfeeding or formula feeding during the procedure reduces the measures of distress; 9) in pediatric patients, non-pharmacological techniques such as distraction, hypnosis and cognitive-behavioural interventions reduce procedural pain caused by the use of needles; 10) in pediatric patients, preventive application of eutectic mixtures of prilocaine and lidocaine allows arterial and venous samples to be taken in optimum conditions; 11) in pediatric patients, the combination of hypnotics (midazolam) and N2O is effective for procedural pain, but may be accompanied by loss of consciousness. "
8. Fentanyl (Sublimaze)FDA LinkGeneric
01/01/2005 - "Propofol appears to be as effective as midazolam/fentanyl for reduction of anterior shoulder dislocation using the modified Kocher's maneuver. "
01/01/2005 - "The authors aimed to compare propofol and midazolam/fentanyl for reduction of anterior shoulder dislocations using the modified Kocher's maneuver. "
01/01/2005 - "Propofol versus midazolam/fentanyl for reduction of anterior shoulder dislocation."
02/01/2015 - "The list of level A recommendations includes: 1) use of IV acetaminophen for opioid sparing properties and reduction of opioid related adverse events; 2) ketamine-midazolam combination preferred over fentanyl-midazolam fentanyl-propofol in pediatric patients; 3) boluses of ketamine IV (particularly in the population under the age of 2 years and over the age of 13) can lead to impairment of the upper airways, including the onset of laryngospasm, requiring specific expertise and skills for administration; 4) the use of ketamine increases the potential risk of psychomotor agitation, which can happen in up to 30% of adult patients (this peculiar side effect can be significantly reduced by concomitant systemic use of benzodiazepines); 5) for shoulder dislocations and fractures of the upper limbs, the performance of brachial plexus block reduces the time spent in ED compared to sedation; 6) pain relief and the use of opioids in patients with acute abdominal pain do not increase the risk of error in the diagnostic and therapeutic pathway in adults; 7) in newborns, the administration of sucrose reduces behavioural responses to blood sampling from a heel puncture; 8) in newborns, breastfeeding or formula feeding during the procedure reduces the measures of distress; 9) in pediatric patients, non-pharmacological techniques such as distraction, hypnosis and cognitive-behavioural interventions reduce procedural pain caused by the use of needles; 10) in pediatric patients, preventive application of eutectic mixtures of prilocaine and lidocaine allows arterial and venous samples to be taken in optimum conditions; 11) in pediatric patients, the combination of hypnotics (midazolam) and N2O is effective for procedural pain, but may be accompanied by loss of consciousness. "
9. Sucrose (Saccharose)IBA
02/01/2015 - "The list of level A recommendations includes: 1) use of IV acetaminophen for opioid sparing properties and reduction of opioid related adverse events; 2) ketamine-midazolam combination preferred over fentanyl-midazolam fentanyl-propofol in pediatric patients; 3) boluses of ketamine IV (particularly in the population under the age of 2 years and over the age of 13) can lead to impairment of the upper airways, including the onset of laryngospasm, requiring specific expertise and skills for administration; 4) the use of ketamine increases the potential risk of psychomotor agitation, which can happen in up to 30% of adult patients (this peculiar side effect can be significantly reduced by concomitant systemic use of benzodiazepines); 5) for shoulder dislocations and fractures of the upper limbs, the performance of brachial plexus block reduces the time spent in ED compared to sedation; 6) pain relief and the use of opioids in patients with acute abdominal pain do not increase the risk of error in the diagnostic and therapeutic pathway in adults; 7) in newborns, the administration of sucrose reduces behavioural responses to blood sampling from a heel puncture; 8) in newborns, breastfeeding or formula feeding during the procedure reduces the measures of distress; 9) in pediatric patients, non-pharmacological techniques such as distraction, hypnosis and cognitive-behavioural interventions reduce procedural pain caused by the use of needles; 10) in pediatric patients, preventive application of eutectic mixtures of prilocaine and lidocaine allows arterial and venous samples to be taken in optimum conditions; 11) in pediatric patients, the combination of hypnotics (midazolam) and N2O is effective for procedural pain, but may be accompanied by loss of consciousness. "
10. Prilocaine (Citanest)FDA LinkGeneric
02/01/2015 - "The list of level A recommendations includes: 1) use of IV acetaminophen for opioid sparing properties and reduction of opioid related adverse events; 2) ketamine-midazolam combination preferred over fentanyl-midazolam fentanyl-propofol in pediatric patients; 3) boluses of ketamine IV (particularly in the population under the age of 2 years and over the age of 13) can lead to impairment of the upper airways, including the onset of laryngospasm, requiring specific expertise and skills for administration; 4) the use of ketamine increases the potential risk of psychomotor agitation, which can happen in up to 30% of adult patients (this peculiar side effect can be significantly reduced by concomitant systemic use of benzodiazepines); 5) for shoulder dislocations and fractures of the upper limbs, the performance of brachial plexus block reduces the time spent in ED compared to sedation; 6) pain relief and the use of opioids in patients with acute abdominal pain do not increase the risk of error in the diagnostic and therapeutic pathway in adults; 7) in newborns, the administration of sucrose reduces behavioural responses to blood sampling from a heel puncture; 8) in newborns, breastfeeding or formula feeding during the procedure reduces the measures of distress; 9) in pediatric patients, non-pharmacological techniques such as distraction, hypnosis and cognitive-behavioural interventions reduce procedural pain caused by the use of needles; 10) in pediatric patients, preventive application of eutectic mixtures of prilocaine and lidocaine allows arterial and venous samples to be taken in optimum conditions; 11) in pediatric patients, the combination of hypnotics (midazolam) and N2O is effective for procedural pain, but may be accompanied by loss of consciousness. "

Therapies and Procedures

1. Analgesia
2. Anesthesia
3. Conscious Sedation
4. Length of Stay
5. Traction