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Gangrene

Death and putrefaction of tissue usually due to a loss of blood supply.
Also Known As:
Gangrenes
Networked: 2002 relevant articles (63 outcomes, 68 trials/studies)

Relationship Network

Disease Context: Research Results

Related Diseases

1. Thrombosis (Thrombus)
2. Ulcer
3. Pain (Aches)
4. Ischemia
5. Infection

Experts

1. Warkentin, Theodore E: 13 articles (12/2015 - 09/2002)
2. Aronow, Wilbert S: 6 articles (09/2010 - 02/2004)
3. Frykberg, Robert G: 5 articles (02/2015 - 10/2003)
4. Vogel, Todd R: 5 articles (02/2014 - 12/2009)
5. Harris, Linda M: 5 articles (09/2012 - 01/2005)
6. Dosluoglu, Hasan H: 4 articles (09/2012 - 11/2007)
7. Dryjski, Maciej L: 4 articles (09/2012 - 11/2007)
8. Kuz'min, V V: 4 articles (05/2008 - 01/2007)
9. VADT Investigators: 3 articles (06/2015 - 01/2009)
10. Turns, Martin: 3 articles (03/2015 - 08/2011)

Drugs and Biologics

Drugs and Important Biological Agents (IBA) related to Gangrene:
1. Aspirin (Acetylsalicylic Acid)FDA LinkGeneric
2. Adrenal Cortex Hormones (Corticosteroids)IBA
3. Heparin (Liquaemin)FDA LinkGeneric
4. Alprostadil (Muse)FDA LinkGeneric
5. AnticoagulantsIBA
07/01/2009 - "Corticosteroids and anticoagulants relieved the symptoms; however, deep ulcers remained after the removal of gangrene. "
05/01/2010 - "At univariate analysis, the factors associated with poorer limb salvage rates during follow-up were the presence of ischemic ulcers or gangrene (log-rank, 8.4; P = .004; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-3.5; odds ratio [OR], 2.1), the presence of only one patent tibial vessel (log-rank, 41.3; P < .001; 95% CI, 3.1-10.8, OR, 5.8), redo surgery (log-rank, 12.4; P < .001; 95% CI, 1.4-4; OR, 2.4) and the postoperative treatment with antiplatelet therapy in comparison to oral anticoagulants (log-rank, 5.1; P = .02; 95% CI, 1.0-3.4; OR, 1.8). "
05/01/2003 - "Oral anticoagulants are not administered in active HIT type II, in deep vein thrombosis with high international normalized ratio (INR) and thrombin-antithrombin complexes, and low protein C levels to avoid the possibility of venous limb gangrene development. "
02/01/2005 - "The avoidance of early transition to oral anticoagulants in patients with acute heparin-induced thrombocytopenia also has been advised because of the potential for further thrombotic complications, including venous limb gangrene and warfarin-induced skin necrosis."
10/01/2013 - "Purpura fulminans is a life-threatening hematologic emergency characterized by extensive skin necrosis with hemorrhagic infarction, hypotension and gangrene which may arise from severe sepsis; mostly gram negative sepsis though also associated with some gram positive organisms, similarly viral infections like varicella and measles have been implicated; it may also arise from congenital deficiency of the anticoagulants protein C, S, and antithrombin III; and it may also be idiopathic. "
6. Cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan)FDA LinkGeneric
7. Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin (Heparin, Low Molecular Weight)IBA
8. Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors (Antiplatelet Drugs)IBA
9. Iloprost (Ventavis)FDA Link
10. Warfarin (Coumadin)FDA LinkGeneric

Therapies and Procedures

1. Amputation
2. Debridement
3. Ligation
4. Thrombectomy
5. Limb Salvage